Street Lighting: is it fit for purpose?

One of the quotes I often use is from Yuval Noah Harari, when he speaks of the Scientific Revolution in which we currently find ourselves.

‘The idea of progress is built on the notion that if we admit our ignorance and invest resources in research, things can improve’.

There is no shortage of research into street lighting, and its effect in respect to burglary, theft and violent crime, however finding a consensus is slightly harder to come by.

After the government’s doubling of its Safer Streets Fund to £45 million, following the sad events in Clapham earlier this year, I had to wonder whether this was a considered approach based on the evidence; or merely a knee jerk reaction, some vote grabbing headlines for a government known for its lackadaisical approach to the truth.

In this podcast for ‘The Light Review’ I speak to two eminent professionals in the field; Steve Fotios, Professor of Lighting and Visual Perception at the University Of Sheffield; editor of Lighting research and Technology, and Allan Howard, Technical Director of Lighting & Energy Solutions at WSP. This is a must see for anyone interested in their local area and for anyone working in Lighting Design.

STOP PRESS!

And as a special extra, we’re able to include the recent webinar from the ILP: The Role of Public Lighting in Designing Safer Places, presented by Dr. Jemima Unwin and Prof. Peter Raynham of University College London (Institute for Environmental Design & Engineering). If you’re stuck for time, that presentation starts at 26:46 of this podcast.

You can contact Chris at cf@thelightreviewonline.com “‘Architecture is the masterly, correct and magnificent play of masses brought together in light. Our eyes are made to see forms in light; light and shade reveal these forms; cubes, cones, spheres, cylinders or pyramids are the great primary forms which light reveals to advantage; the image of these is distinct and tangible within us without ambiguity’ ” — Le Corbusier. 'Vers une architecture' [Towards a new Architecture] (1923)

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